A South Australian family is left without their little girl after she was hit by a vehicle on her parents’ property. 

The two-year-old was playing in her driveway on Saturday when she was struck by a four-wheel-drive, driven by a relative. She died in hospital on Sunday.

This is the third child in just a few months who has died after being hit in a driveway accident in South Australia.

Three toddlers, three deaths and three very tragic reminders of why we need to be extra careful in our cars, even when parked in our driveways.

Two-year-old dies in driveway accident in Parawa 

The most recent death occurred on a property at Parawa, about 80 kilometres south of Adelaide. Emergency crew airlifted the toddler to the Women’s and Children’s Hospital in a critical condition. Police said the girl succumbed to her injuries and “sadly was pronounced deceased” on Sunday.

Few details have been released by police, as they continue to investigate the incident. The driver, a 55-year-old man, was not physically injured in the crash.

“This is an absolute tragedy and our thoughts are with the friends and family at this time,” acting chief executive officer McKeely Denholm says.

18-month-old dies in driveway accident in Tailem Bend

In July this year, an eerily similar incident occurred in Tailem Bend, about 100 kilometres south-east of Adelaide. However, this time, the toddler was just 18-months-old.

Again, the child was hit in his own driveaway by a four-wheel-drive. Emergency services immediately rushed the child to the hospital with life-threatening injuries, but, once again, the toddler did not make it.

“Despite the desperate efforts of paramedics, sadly the child died at the hospital,” police said in a statement.

Two-year-old dies in driveaway accident in Angle Vale

Indeed, this third tragic event happened just one week before the above death. In this instance, it was a two-year-old boy who was hit and killed by his family’s car at Angle Vale, about 30 kilometres north of Adelaide.

That’s three children who won’t get to experience their first day of school, receive their first trophy or get behind the wheel of their own first car. And three families who have been forced to bury their babies. How awful is this?

What’s even worse is that this kind of thing happens all the time.

One child is run over in their driveway every week in Australia

On average, seven Australian children are killed each year and 60 seriously injured after being hit or run over by a motor vehicle at home. Not on the roads. AT HOME. Most of the children injured and killed are under five years of age. 

Children are curious things. They move quickly, especially when they see something they want, like a ball on the road or a parent pulling into the driveway after a big day of work. This is why it’s so important that we always know exactly where our kids are when reversing in and out of the driveway.

What can we do to keep our children safer?

Below are some tips from My Licence SA.

  • Always supervise any children whenever you have to move a car. Hold their hand or hold them close to keep them safe.
  • If you’re the only adult at home and need to move a vehicle, even just a small distance, put children securely in the vehicle with you while you move it.
  • Encourage children to play in safer areas, away from the driveway and cars.
  • Limit a child’s access to the driveway. For example, use security doors, fencing or gates.
  • Be aware of your vehicle’s blind zones. Learn the best way to use the mirrors and any other reversing aids in your vehicle.

When it comes to our kids and driveway safety, you can never ever be too careful. For more car safety tips, please read:

Author

Born and raised in Canada, Jenna now lives in Far North Queensland with her tribe. When the mum-of-three is not writing, you can find her floating in the pool, watching princess movies, frolicking on the beach, bouncing her baby to sleep or nagging her older kids to put on their pants.

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