Next time you’re looking at your 20-year-old chunky timber TV cabinet, don’t be so quick to diss it. Ugly as it might be, it could well be an epic kids’ kitchen in waiting. Check out this epic tv cabinet makeover!

Clara Bradley of Sweet Pea Interiors can take a piece of furniture and envision an up-cycled version, many of us would never dream of. And while often when up-cycling furniture it’s a lick of paint and a change of handles – Clara took this old unit to a whole new level.

Clara has generously shared with Mum Central how she transformed the TV unit into a Masterchef quality pint-sized kids’ kitchen in around 10 hours and for under $70!

DIY kids kitchen
You can totally make this yourself! Source: Clara Bradley

From daggy TV unit to play kitchen MAGIC!

First step: You have to have a unit! Clara scored this cabinet for FREE on Facebook Marketplace, so it pays to have a look there. Lots of people are keen to get rid of old furniture as long as you can come to pick it up.

DIY kids kitchen
BEFORE: The TV Unit was a freebie found on Facebook Marketplace. SCORE! Source: Clara Bradley

Second step: Decide on the look you want to achieve. Clara wanted a more refined and stylish kids kitchen than what was often available at retailers. For ideas, she asked the always reliable Bunnings Mums Australia Facebook Group for their thoughts. Clara was overwhelmed by the response she got, saying it’s “such a great page for inspiration and tips.” #yayforDIYmums!

Third step: Get ready for some DIY action! Firstly, start with giving every surface of the unit a very good clean. Clara says that after cleaning, she painted the interior and exterior of the unit with a sage colour. “I knew this wasn’t a ‘normal’ kiddie colour but wanted a more upmarket theme,” Clara says. Finishing off with blackboard painted sides of the cabinet.

A sophisticated look on a miniature scale. Source: Clara Bradley

Just like any good reno, there was some slight remodelling. Clara removed the left-hand door and using a hand saw and hammer, knocked out the dividing ‘wall’ for more bench playing space. Ever so resourceful, Clara used one of the shelves to extend the bench, supporting it with battens underneath. HOW CLEVER! #wastenotwantnot

With the structural work done, it’s time to flex your decorating muscle! Clara applied a brick-look wallpaper remnant with PVA glue for an ‘industrial look’. DOESN’T IT LOOK PERFECT?

DIY kids kitchen
Brick print wallpaper remnants fit just right! Source: Clara Bradley

The devil is in the detail with any DIY, right? Finishing kitchen touches included a small sink and cooking elements which were found on Facebook Marketplace and we spray painted them black. The taps and dish rack were also spray painted.

Clara used a jigsaw to cut a hole out of the bench top to fit the sink before applying self-adhesive tiles to the bench for a convincing kitchen look. The right-hand side of the cupboard was painted a contrasting colour with brand new handles to replicate a fridge and freezer. Because what’s a kitchen without a fridge?

Creating the oven door was a stroke of genius. Clara says “I cut the insert from the bottom cupboard and used the top of a plastic lid and glued on so it looked like an oven door. “ Like I said, GENIUS.

AFTER: Finished, kitted out and ready for play! Source: Clara Bradley

Accessories really do make a kitchen pop! Consequently, a trip to Kmart was just the ticket. Clara bought tea towels she turned into small framed prints, utensils, a display shelf, plant and bamboo storage box all from Kmart.

All up, Clara says the project took her around 10 hours to do and given the unit itself was free, it cost only around $63 to transform it into the finished, decked out kids’ kitchen. AMAZING! Thanks for sharing with us Clara!

What say you, do you have a cabinet you think could work? Would you be willing to give this DIY a go?


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Author

South Australian mum and self proclaimed foodie, Lexi can most days be found in the kitchen, apron tied firm and armed with a whisk or wooden spoon!

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