Emma Watkins. She’s one of the most wonderful Australian women to ever come into our lives, entertaining our children with her endless optimism and bright smile.

emma watkins pregnancy struggle
Source: Instagram

We love her immensely, not just for her efforts as a children’s entertainer, but for her honesty around her personal health struggles, her advocacy in raising awareness for endometriosis, and her support for other women who are going through a similar battle.

Happily ever after

Emma Watkins, or Emma Wiggle as we will always know her, has been in the spotlight for over a decade now. She’s recently married musician Oliver Brian, whom she met through The Wiggles, in a magical vintage-inspired wedding.

emma watkins wedding
Source: Instagram

She is also in the process of completing her PhD and has started a new Instagram account for Emma Memma, who is her latest entertainer persona.

Emma Memma is a big fan of pinks and oranges. Source: Instagram

‘I don’t know what my chances are’

Recently she also spoke openly about her desire to start a family down the road and the stark reality that this simply might not happen for her.

Speaking plainly, I just don’t know if I will be able to,” Watkins told The Daily Telegraph.

“After stage four endo, I am pretty realistic in the fact I don’t know what my chances are. If it happens, that would be amazing, if it doesn’t, that is okay too.”

Source: Instagram

Emma, like one in 10 Australian women, suffers from endometriosis which causes tissue similar to the uterine lining to grow outside of the uterus, causing pain, fertility issues, and other complications.

Four years ago she stepped down from The Wiggles stage for weeks to recover from surgery. She also shared her health battle publicly, urging other women to seek help if they are experiencing heavy, painful periods.

I think I’ve almost left it too long and I realised that lots of people don’t even think about going to see somebody earlier. Now I need to take the rest and be serious about looking at my health as a priority,” she said in 2018.

“If I can spread awareness about checking up on your symptoms, and if you do have pain go and see somebody because I know it has been the best thing for me.” 

‘Taken me a good four years’

Now, nearly four years later, she admits that falling pregnant won’t be easy but she is also not in any rush to start trying.

My headspace is not completely there yet. After the surgery and recovery, it has taken me a good four years to get my body to be in a place where it is really healthy.”

Source: Instagram

In previous interviews, Emma has hinted that, if she cannot carry a baby herself, she’s open to other ways to become a mum.

I would love to have kids, I would love to have a family,” she said.

“I’m very aware that it’s going to be hard for me to have kids – but that doesn’t worry me. There are so many other options now, it’s OK. I feel like I’ve dropped the pressure on myself. I feel like I’m now going to embrace a different family structure.”

Source: Instagram

Emma’s pragmatic honesty is an absolute breath of fresh air and a reminder to all women who are or have been in the throes of endo that they are not alone.

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Author

Born and raised in Canada, Jenna now lives in Far North Queensland with her tribe. When the mum-of-three is not writing, you can find her floating in the pool, watching princess movies, frolicking on the beach, bouncing her baby to sleep or nagging her older kids to put on their pants.

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