10 popular baby and children’s products have been recalled from shelves in Queensland and the Australian Capital Territory after being deemed unsafe by officials.

Among the recalled toys? Wooden puzzles, a rainbow stacker, plush toys, rattles, and soft cuddle blankets.

It’s important for all of our QLD and ACT parents to have a look at the list below to ensure none of their kids’ toys (or Chrissy presents) are on this list.

Toys recalled in ACT

Product Safety Australia recently issued a warning to ACT consumers shopping at KaiserCraft.

Kaisercraft baby toy recall
Source: Product Safety Australia

Several of their popular baby toys may be contaminated with mould including the:

What are the concerns?

According to Product Safety Australia, 

Exposure to mould spores may affect those with allergies and can cause an adverse reaction, including an allergic reaction, infection or health complications. This may pose a risk to children with weakened immune systems.”

The toys affected by the recall were only sold at the Kaisercraft Majura Park store between 28 October and 8 November 2020.

Consumers should immediately stop using the products and return them to the nearest Kaisercraft store to receive a full refund.

We are all well aware that mould and children’s toys are incredibly unsafe. Have a read of this mum’s story of her son’s encounter with a mouldy bath toy.


Toys recalled in Queensland

Recently the Office of Fair Trading also shared a list of recalled toys they have pulled off the shelves across Queensland.

As part of their annual Operation Safe Christmas, officials visited 266 stores and pop-up shops across Queensland and inspected more than 5,640 different toy lines.

Of these, six toys were removed from sale for safety reasons.

toys recall QLD
Source: Fair Trading QLD

These include: 

  • Wooden puzzle (numbers)
  • Wooden puzzle (alphabet)
  • Magnetic puzzle (numbers)
  • Rainbow circle stacker
  • Paw patrol plush toy (not official merchandise)
  • Squirrel toy nut

Toys recalled due to choking concerns

All of these toys have small parts and pose a choking hazard in children under 36 months of age. The Paw Patrol plush toy releases stuffing from the seams on the backs and stomach, posing a choking hazard while the Squirrel Nut comes with a nut that can be a choking hazard for children.

The Attorney-General said,

Considering the huge number of toy lines inspected, it’s good to see a very low number of non-compliant toys were found, which shows most manufacturers and retailers are aware of and sticking to their obligations around consumer safety.

However, just because thousands of toys have been checked, this isn’t a free pass on safety matters.”

You can check  www.qld.gov.au/fairtrading for more information about these bans and what to do if you have one of these unsafe toys.


Kmart toy also pulled from shelves

Another popular product sold at Kmart has also been pulled from the shelves, although Kmart hasn’t released an official recall notice. This happened at the end of October but many parents may have missed it.

Source: Kmart and Facebook

The Wooden Climbing Ladder was sold across the nation and online and was one of the favourite finds among Kmart Mums, especially in the lead-up to Christmas.

However, you can no longer purchase the Kmart Wooden Climbing Ladder due to concerns the ladder will break under pressure.

According to Kmart, 

This is not a product recall – but we ask customers with any concerns, to please contact the Kmart customer service team on 1800 124 125.”


Safety standards in children’s toys

When choosing toys and gifts for children this Christmas, there are a few simple rules to remember:

  • Toys with small parts are a choking hazard, even in older kids. This beautiful little boy lost his life after choking on a bouncy ball – a tragic outcome and a reminder that small toys are very dangerous!
  • Beware of button batteries, not just in toys but a range of products. They can cause serious injuries or death if swallowed.
  • Be aware of toys with magnetic balls as well. While not banned, they can be very unsafe, especially in the wrong hands.
  • Avoid small high-powered magnets. These are banned from sale in Australia as they pose serious health risks if swallowed.
  • Stick to reputable brands or retailers. Australian-made is best to ensure the products comply with Australian safety standards.
  • If buying online, check information about the seller, and always ensure the toy has not been banned or recalled.

To stay up to date on all toy and product recalls, follow Mum Central on Facebook. Below are a few of the most recent recalls to be aware of:

Author

Born and raised in Canada, Jenna now lives in Far North Queensland with her tribe. When the mum-of-three is not writing, you can find her floating in the pool, watching princess movies, frolicking on the beach, bouncing her baby to sleep or nagging her older kids to put on their pants.

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