Like most new parents, *Jean felt like she was continuously losing her newborn’s dummy. Put one on the bench, turn around and it’s gone.

She just chalked it up to mum brain, grabbed another dummy and went about her baby business. As you do.

However, one morning her greyhound dog seemed a bit out of sorts. She watched as he threw up 13 pacifiers – 13!!! Jean immediately rushed her pet to the vet where they gave him an emergency X-ray to reveal another pacifier in his small intestine.

dog dummy warning
Source: Facebook

The vet performed emergency surgery to remove the collection of dummies and found one more in the pup’s stomach. So 15 dummies in total!

‘Literally insane’

Jean shared her story in a private Facebook group and, with her permission, we wanted to pass her message on.

I wanted to share with the group for anyone with a new baby, so you won’t make the same mistake I did!” 

dog dummies
Poor pup had quite the fright! Source: Facebook

The new mum explains that her pup spent two days in the ER and the bill set her back $5,000. Check out the poor dog’s incision scar!

It’s going to be a long recovery for Jean’s furry friend. Source: Facebook

And the collection of dummies? She shared a photo of them lined up on the counter.

All those pacifiers were clear in colour,” she explains. “So those darker black ones had to be in his stomach for weeks or a month! No idea how long! Literally insane.” 

15 dummies in one dog’s tummy! Source: Facebook

Jean admits that from now on, she will be putting her baby’s pacifiers on a lanyard clip. And binning the ones in the pic above!

We wish Jean’s greyhound all the best in a speedy recovery!

*name has been changed


Pet and baby safety

There are a lot of tips about how to welcome a new baby to your pet with the focus on keeping bub safe. We know not to leave your pet unattended with your child or to let your child pet the dog when he’s having a feed.

Vet Dr Amanda Chin shares these great tips:

  • Block off the baby’s nursery or your bedroom to your pet with baby gates
  • Place the nappy bin away from the pet’s sleeping or eating area
  • Introduce the pet to the smell of nappies, baby oils and creams
  • Play soundtracks of baby’s crying and give your pet a favourite toy or treat – start off with low level and short and slowly increase the volume and duration
  • Use a doll to practice speaking in a baby voice so the pet recognises your new voices
  • Address any fear aggression with a veterinary behaviour professional
  • Train your pet to “sit”, “stay”, “come” and “go to its bed/mat”
  • Talk to your GP about your cat, the potential of toxoplasmosis and safety precautions
  • Ensure all pets are on appropriate parasite control such as intestinal worms and fleas
  • Stock up on pet dental chews, pig ears and rawhide bones as they make great treats
  • Place some extra hiding spaces around the house for your cat such as a box, cupboard or a new shelf high up as this will bring added comfort for your cat

However, it’s important to also keep your pet safe from potential baby-related hazards. Not only do dogs like to chew ANYTHING, dummies included, I know my dog also enjoys stealing baby wipes and has even taken a nappy out of the bin to have a sniff.

  • Keep all baby-related items out of reach of your pet including soft toys, dummies, wipes, creams, etc.
  • Aim to spend at least 15 minutes of one-on-one time with your pet
  • Remember that a lot of baby and toddler foods are dangerous for dogs including raisins, grapes, avocadoes, and large amounts of cheese. If you are feeding your child these items, make it a habit to use a vacuum cleaner, not just the dog as a vacuum cleaner (I do this ALL the time), after a feed.

What to read next

 

Author

Born and raised in Canada, Jenna now lives in Far North Queensland with her tribe. When the mum-of-three is not writing, you can find her floating in the pool, watching princess movies, frolicking on the beach, bouncing her baby to sleep or nagging her older kids to put on their pants.

Write A Comment